Bangkok Hilton was a television mini series in four episodes, originally aired in 1989. The series starred among others Nicole Kidman, Denholm Elliott and Hugo Weaving. Bangkok Hilton was an immediate success and quickly gained a vast audience.

In the first part of the series, Gerda is quite frequent, and plays a central character. Her character - Lady Faulkner - is a far cry from the liberal-minded, compassionate Ann Reynolds. Lady Faulkner is cold, and egocentric, with little to care for except keeping her own old-fashioned world intact. She is the reason for the film's basic plot, as she refuses to let her daughter meet the father of her child. Therefore, the two separate and the child stays with her mother at the family residence - Guardbridge. However, as the girl grows up she gets curious and wants to find who her father really was. When both her mother and grand-mother are dead, she tries to find him. And from there the story develops further.

Gerda plays the wicked grand-mother, Lady Faulkner, and Nicole Kidman plays the grand-daugther. The two actresses do not have any scenes together, as Gerda's character is removed before Nicole Kidman is introduced.

However, Gerda shares scenes with Denholm Elliott, famous British actor, known for the role as Marcus Brody in Raiders of the Lost Ark and Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade.

Gerda's character only appear in the first part of the series, and never returns or is referred to later on.

Lady Faulkner, even though different from the other agreeable characters Gerda had played, still fits in with the pattern. She is a woman of class, with a strict upper-class accent and she has a pedistal position. These are features that Lady Faulkner shares with many of Gerda's other characters through her career. She seemed to always get parts as upper-class, sophisticated women.

Gerda is introduced in Bangkok Hilton as the old-fashioned Lady Faulkner.
 
Lady Faulkner together with her husband, Sir Richard, played by Michael Sinclair.
 
Gerda's last scene in Bangkok Hilton.